Joe Posusney

Pharma Market Access Contract Managment

Data Analyst

Senior Technology Leader

International Sales/Marketing

Joe Posusney

Pharma Market Access Contract Managment

Data Analyst

Senior Technology Leader

International Sales/Marketing

Blog Post

How Many Lead Acid Batteries Do I Need To Run My Operation?

April 28, 2020 Lean

That is a great question because when you select the right number it can save you literally thousands.  Many companies will take this question very seriously and calculate the amount of work each MHE equipment will be expected to do in a shift and translate that into the amount of energy that will be required to support that operation.  Some companies have a standard battery/truck that they use based on the equipment they have chosen.  When a battery management system is used that number is then taken down even lower.  That is a great starting point, but like Mike Tyson said everyone has a plan till you get punched in the mouth.

The number of batteries that is initial selected needs to work for the next 5-7 years, which is the length of most contracts currently in the market.  The assumption along with this is often forgotten a few months down the contract.  That assumption is that the batteries will last the full amount of time.  If you just assume that the batteries will last and all will go to plan, you will be in for a rude awakening.

Lets take a look at the assumptions one often makes at the start of the contract for Lead-Acid Batteries:

  • The workload demand will remain constant during the length of the contract. –  Our constantly changing environment is something we know change is the rule rather than the exception.
  • The batteries will be watered when needed. – Lack of water kills batteries. See link below.
  • The batteries will be cooled down after charge. – Heat accelerates corrosion and it doubles for every 10 deg C.
  • The batteries will not be over-discharged.
  • All your chargers are working correctly and regularly producing fully charged batteries.
  • Operators are following the battery indicator on the management system.  – How do you measure that?
  • Batteries will get damaged and need to be repaired or replaced.- If this lasts too long when batteries are taken out of the rotation the rest of the fleet now has to work harder for that period.  If there are multiple batteries out of service your fleet now is accumulating cycle and having reduced cool down time.

The only way to know for sure if you have the right number of batteries is to constantly monitor the fleet for all these assumptions and create trigger points when a threshold is crossed.  You can then react if the company work demands increases and the trucks are running harder and longer hours.

Monitoring the Battery itself with automatic data uploads is the best way to ensure a full battery life.


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